Two new dinosaur species found in Antarctica

02 March 2004 | 15:02 Code : 3641 Geoscience events
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The 70 million-year-old fossils of the carnivore would have rested for millenniums at the bottom of an Antarctic sea, while remains...
The 70 million-year-old fossils of the carnivore would have rested for millenniums at the bottom of an Antarctic sea, while remains of the 100-foot-long (30 meter) herbivore were found on the top of a mountain. They would have lived in a different Antarctica -- one that was warm and wet, the two teams of researchers, both funded by the National Science Foundation, said. The little carnivore -- about 6 feet (1.8 meters) tall -- was found on James Ross Island, off the coast of the Antarctic Peninsula. Not yet named, the animal probably floated out to sea after it died and settled to the bottom of what was then a shallow area of the Weddell Sea, said Judd Case of St. Mary's College of California, who helped find the fossils. Its bones and teeth suggest it may represent a population of two-legged carnivores that survived in the Antarctic long after other predators took over elsewhere on the globe. "For whatever reason, they were still hanging out on the Antarctic continent," Case said in a statement. A second team led by William Hammer of Augustana College in Rock Island, Illinois found the 200 million-year-old plant-eater's fossils on a mountaintop 13,000 feet (3,900 meters) high near the Beardmore Glacier.

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